The Basics Of Making An Impact: ‘…and Death Came Third!’ 10th Anniversary Celebration

Ten years ago, in 2006, Peter Roper and Andy Lopata published the first edition of ‘…and Death Came Third! The Definitive Guide to Networking and Speaking in Public’ on Bookshaker. The book was a big success with over 2,000 copies sold in the first 48 hours alone.Panoma Press published the second edition in 2011 and negotiated a separate edition published in Malaysia and Singapore.

We have consistently been amazed by the affection held for ‘…and Death Came Third!’ by many readers, reflected by the emails and comments we have received from people from a range of backgrounds. The book focuses on the basics of networking and presentation skills, giving readers simple approaches to working the room at networking events or giving their first talk.

To celebrate this, we have got together with our network to provide a series of short ‘Basics’ blogs. Over the month of September Andy, Peter and Panoma Press owner Mindy Gibbins-Klein will share a guest blog every day exploring the basics of business, from the basics of confidence and attitude to negotiation and strategy. We have also made the Kindle edition of this excellent book just £1.99 or $2.99 throughout September, so if you haven’t read it yet, get your copy now!

Today’s blog comes from Nigel Risner and looks at The Basics of  Making An Impact:

What does it mean to create IMPACT?

I spend my life sharing how to create impact but most people aren’t in the room to hear the message.

They are in the room but they are not really “IN THE ROOM”.

So how to do you make an IMPACT?

  1. Be really present, decide this is where you want to be, even if you don’t. Sometimes you have to “act as if “.

2. Model the best. Look at what actors and politicians do.They seem interested rather than being interesting. After you have left them, do people feel that they were listened to or you were just waiting for your chance to reply?

3. Be passionate. Some people may not always like you but you have to have energy about you instead of a CBA attitude (can’t be arsed).

4. When all is said and done much more is said than done. Make sure that you do what you say. Believe me I didn’t really want to write this article, but I made a commitment.

5. Communicate in their language not yours. In my book, It’s a Zoo Around Here, I identify all the different styles.

6. Trust yourself, trust your friends and trust the process.

Most of all make an effort to create an impact and remember the words of Dame Anita Roddick; “If you think you are too small to make an IMPACT, try going to bed with a mosquito in the room.”

Nigel Risner is an award-winning speaker and author based in the UK and serving clients globally. A Fellow of the Professional Speaking Association of the UK and Ireland, Nigel makes an impact wherever he goes. His books The Impact Code and It’s a Zoo Around Here are available on Amazon.

Nigelrisner.com

Don’t forget: the Kindle edition of ‘…and Death Came Third!’ is available for just £1.99 or $2.99 throughout September. Get your copy now!

 

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The Basics Of Your Online Profile: ‘…and Death Came Third!’ 10th Anniversary Celebration

Ten years ago, in 2006, Peter Roper and Andy Lopata published the first edition of ‘…and Death Came Third! The Definitive Guide to Networking and Speaking in Public’ on Bookshaker. The book was a big success with over 2,000 copies sold in the first 48 hours alone.Panoma Press published the second edition in 2011 and negotiated a separate edition published in Malaysia and Singapore.

We have consistently been amazed by the affection held for ‘…and Death Came Third!’ by many readers, reflected by the emails and comments we have received from people from a range of backgrounds. The book focuses on the basics of networking and presentation skills, giving readers simple approaches to working the room at networking events or giving their first talk.

To celebrate this, we have got together with our network to provide a series of short ‘Basics’ blogs. Over the month of September Andy, Peter and Panoma Press owner Mindy Gibbins-Klein will share a guest blog every day exploring the basics of business, from the basics of confidence and attitude to negotiation and strategy. We have also made the Kindle edition of this excellent book just £1.99 or $2.99 throughout September, so if you haven’t read it yet, get your copy now!

Today’s blog comes from Vanessa Vallely and looks at The Basics of Your Online Profile:

Managing your online profile – don’t be an Error 404 – Page not found!!
Roll back ten years, we relied solely on making a good impression on people when we met them in order to build relationships for the future.   Word of mouth counted, and referrals from others all helped, but generally it was all about the face to face and those important first impressions.  Today’s world is very different as we have to factor in that we now live in an online world, where a  majority of individuals will look you up on some form of social media prior to meeting you.  You have to ask yourself, what do they see when they google your name or your business?  Is it a really good website or a solid LinkedIN profile that has had the time and effort given to it that it deserves.   A good test is to google yourself and see what results come up!  When you see your results, you need to evaluate whether what you see is enough in terms of the brand you wish to portray/the services/products you are trying to sell or the impression you want to create.   In terms of your Google search, unless you have a very unique name and own the .com or you are lucky enough to be featured in the press, the first thing that may appear is a LinkedIN profile, and if you don’t have one of them we have some work to do as LinkedIN is undoubtedly the yellow pages of our times.  You know that being online in some guise makes business sense, but sometimes it is a case of finding the time to do it and do it well.  However, you have to be in it to win it.  Before you get started you need to ascertain what channels are right for you and how much time and effort you will have to maintain it going forward, having a solid and well presented presence online is not a one time activity, it is ongoing!.  Bear in mind that online presence generates assumptions and opinions about who we are/ the services/products we offer.  In old money, it is a bit like having your own shop window, in which case, you have to ask yourself why would you leave it empty!

Either way if you are just starting out or an old hand, evaluating what others see on line requires thought and planning.

So where to start. The basics.

A good LinkedIN profile – by this, I mean one that has had some time dedicated to it!  Firstly, we need a decent headshot (we are a visual nation!), no holiday snaps, half of people cut out and unless you are in the drinks industry, no glasses of wine in hand.  Secondly, take time to work on your summary area.  A number of people miss this on their Linkedin profiles and it really is a place where you can synopsise what you are about and lay out your key achievements in a few easily digestible paragraphs.  When writing your summary, don’t forget to use cause and effect here and quantify your statements.  If describing work projects, add in context that shows the complexity of what you do, eg the monetary value of the project, the geographies involved, the amount of people and ultimately don’t forget to detail what you delivered and the value it added to the client or business.

Twitter – an excellent tool for making contacts.  Be mindful that Twitter is much about promoting others as it is yourself!  Again, you need a strong bio as a summary that surmises you as an individual, a decent picture or avatar (logo).  Be mindful of the brand you create on line, if you are different people on different social media channels, this can lead to distrust and a feeling that you are not being authentic.

Facebook – great for small businesses, but can be dangerous for professional online branding.  Without generalising, people tend to be slightly more relaxed with their opinions and their photos on facebook than they would be on any business related social media channel, so be mindful of your security settings, as once again, if your facebook page is open it will come up in a google search and you have to think about what people will see and the assumptions they will make!  My suggestion would be to take off the option that allows people to post directly to your page and to turn on approval when you are tagged in photos.

Snapchat, Instagram, Google + – all growing in popularity, but for some businesses a step too far.  Sometimes is best to choose one or two channels and do them well as opposed to having a presence on multiple channels that you do not have the time to maintain.  The solution to this could be an aggregator that posts to multiple channels, however be wary of these, as you may have different audiences per channel.  Eg, a majority of my work related posts would be of no interest to my family contacts on Facebook.

Top tips

  • Be authentic - Above anything else, your online professional brand needs to be consistent.  Whether you are on two channels or five, the picture needs to be the same in terms of who you are and what you stand for – this builds trust with your followers from the get go!
  • Promote others – Social media, used well is a great place to promote the activities of others, this also helps build relationships for the future.
  • Time – Where do you fit it all in!  As with anything, you get out what you put in!  There is no point allocating a set period in the day to update your social media as things are happening all the time that you may wish to respond to, however you may wish to post general updates during busy periods.  You can check the latest research on optimum times to certain channels via the internet.
  • Controversy – no thanks! – Sometimes it is easy to get embroiled in on line debates and add opinions, be mindful of the energy you spend on these and the affect this could have on brand if such debate are open to the public!
  • Your online presence is not just in your hands – Be mindful that others also hold the reigns of your online brand and reputation!  One negative comment that is not responded to it in the right way can lead to a viral and if we are going viral, we want it to be a good one!  If you say something on social media or post an image, then you must also be prepared for it to be aired in the public domain!  Nothing online is private, no matter what security settings you may have put in place!
  • Keep it up to date – there is nothing worse that creating a channel and then leaving it to gather dust.  If you are not using it, shut it down  or people to assume you are no longer in business.  I would also advise periodic updates to whatever channels you chose to use including updates on the latest projects you have delivered, as well as the use of images, film and should you wish an interesting log of your activities (eg events you may have attended, golden nuggets of business advice you may have picked up along the way).
  • Say thank you – if someone shares something, takes time to comment, tags in someone else that may be interested in what you are doing, please say thank you.  It is a common courtesy and will definitely encourage engagement in the future.

 

Vanessa Vallely is the Managing Director of WeAreTheCity, a popular Public speaker and the founder of Gender Networks

Don’t forget: the Kindle edition of ‘…and Death Came Third!’ is available for just £1.99 or $2.99 throughout September. Get your copy now!


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The Basics of Celebrity Service: ‘…and Death Came Third!’ 10th Anniversary Celebration

Ten years ago, in 2006, Peter Roper and Andy Lopata published the first edition of ‘…and Death Came Third! The Definitive Guide to Networking and Speaking in Public’ on Bookshaker. The book was a big success with over 2,000 copies sold in the first 48 hours alone.Panoma Press published the second edition in 2011 and negotiated a separate edition published in Malaysia and Singapore.

We have consistently been amazed by the affection held for ‘…and Death Came Third!’ by many readers, reflected by the emails and comments we have received from people from a range of backgrounds. The book focuses on the basics of networking and presentation skills, giving readers simple approaches to working the room at networking events or giving their first talk.

To celebrate this, we have got together with our network to provide a series of short ‘Basics’ blogs. Over the month of September Andy, Peter and Panoma Press owner Mindy Gibbins-Klein will share a guest blog every day exploring the basics of business, from the basics of confidence and attitude to negotiation and strategy. We have also made the Kindle edition of this excellent book just £1.99 or $2.99 throughout September, so if you haven’t read it yet, get your copy now!

Today’s blog comes from Geoff Ramm and looks at The Basics of Celebrity Service – Discover the gap in your service you never knew existed.

Elliot’s Magic Ticket…


What did you do today for your customer or client (that you needn’t have done) but they loved you for it anyway?

Our son, Elliot (4 years old – and makes a cameo appearance here) wanted to go on a BIG train during the Summer holidays. So I took him up to the Central Station, Newcastle to board a BIG train to the Scottish / English border town of Berwick upon Tweed.

As I entered the Virgin East Coast ticket office I asked for train times and prices for us both.

The ticket lady (Pam Thompson) behind the counter said ‘Under 5′s are Free so he doesn’t need a ticket, but I am sure he’d still like one.   What’s his name?

“Elliot” I replied.  And then she picked up a blank ticket and a pen and wrote down 3 little words.   It made his journey.  It made his day!!!

Here is the Video  (Watch out for Elliot’s cameo appearance)

Celebrity Service

This was wonderfully done by Pam and Virgin Trains and it highlighted to importance of Excitement in her service by bringing a smile to the face of a passenger. She needn’t have done it, but she saw the opportunity.

3 Simple ‘Celebrity Customer Service Rules’

1. Give what you don’t need too.

2. Personalise it if you can.

3. And finally, add a little bit of magic at the end.

All the best,


Geoff Ramm, Customer Service & Marketing Speaker http://www.geofframm.com

Don’t forget: the Kindle edition of ‘…and Death Came Third!’ is available for just £1.99 or $2.99 throughout September. Get your copy now!

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The Basics of Personal Branding: ‘…and Death Came Third!’ 10th Anniversary Celebration

Ten years ago, in 2006, Peter Roper and Andy Lopata published the first edition of ‘…and Death Came Third! The Definitive Guide to Networking and Speaking in Public’ on Bookshaker. The book was a big success with over 2,000 copies sold in the first 48 hours alone.Panoma Press published the second edition in 2011 and negotiated a separate edition published in Malaysia and Singapore.

We have consistently been amazed by the affection held for ‘…and Death Came Third!’ by many readers, reflected by the emails and comments we have received from people from a range of backgrounds. The book focuses on the basics of networking and presentation skills, giving readers simple approaches to working the room at networking events or giving their first talk.

To celebrate this, we have got together with our network to provide a series of short ‘Basics’ blogs. Over the month of September Andy, Peter and Panoma Press owner Mindy Gibbins-Klein will share a guest blog every day exploring the basics of business, from the basics of confidence and attitude to negotiation and strategy. We have also made the Kindle edition of this excellent book just £1.99 or $2.99 throughout September, so if you haven’t read it yet, get your copy now!

Today’s blog comes from Lesley Everett and looks at The Basics of Personal Branding

Three No-Fail Ways To Enhance Your Personal Brand

We live in a connected world where reputation matters more than ever before. It’s no longer good enough just to do a good job – you need others to know who you are, what you do and what you’re great at. This is what lies at the core of personal branding; it’s what people say about you when you’re not around.

In order to find the most success, you must take conscious control of the messages you project.  To do this, you must create a consistent brand that others find easy to talk about.

Here are three basic foundations to do that.

 

1. Stop trying to be somebody you’re not.

It’s easier said than done, but the truth is that, once you identify what you’re great at, what truly motivates you and your core value set,  it is so much simpler to be yourself.  The danger in not doing this is significant. How can others around you understand and trust your brand if you don’t? Taking the time to get to know who you are and what you stand for will help you to avoid diluting  and weakening your opportunity to clearly differentiate yourself. You’ll be seen as transparent and get talked about for the right reasons.

How To Do It: Create 1 hour of thinking space in your diary each week for the next 3 weeks, to get some clarity on your authentic brand.

Consider the following:

  • What do you excel at?
  • What do others always say you’re great at?
  • What experiences in life enable you to do the things you’re good at so brilliantly?
  • What are your key drivers in life?
  • What principles do you stand by?

Start constructing these into a brand statement – a few sentences that sum up the person you are and what you’re great at.

Ask others who know you well for some feedback. What few words would they use to describe you? What do you do best? What could you do better? Use this feedback to ‘map over’ how you see yourself and identify your action points.

 

2. Package your brand consciously.

It’s no good having a defined brand and then not consistently packaging it. Think of this as the outer wrapping that attracts others to you, makes people want to listen to you and follow you on social media.

How To Do It: When you have more clarity on what your brand truly is, think about the layers you can add every day in your interactions that reinforce this brand.

Consider the following:

  • The first impression you create when you enter the room. Does it smack of credibility or apology?
  • Your voice – does it hold interest or bore? Get some feedback.
  • Your dress & appearance – your wardrobe should be an extension of your brand, not get in the way of it

 

3. Project your brand with memorable impact.

You now need to consider how you’re going to get your brand ‘out there’ and become known for what you’re great at. Your exposure and visibility is vital and you need to manage it proactively

How To Do It: Create a visibility plan so that you can strategically increase your exposure in your target market. Who needs to know you, where do you need to be seen and heard?

Consider these things:

  • How do you make your conversations about the other person? You’ll be more memorable when you focus on them.
  • How good are you presenting ? Make a diligent effort to work on your skills as this is a fantastic way to increase your visibility.
  • Do you schoomze in the same circles as your target market? Networking in the right groups is essential.

Keep it going – do something positive and creative every day that adds a layer to your brand – it will quickly become a habit.

Lesley covers the topic of Personal Branding in her books:

Corporate Brand Personality (Kogan Page, Feb 2016)

Walking TALL – key steps to total image impact

www.lesleyeverett.com

Don’t forget: the Kindle edition of ‘…and Death Came Third!’ is available for just £1.99 or $2.99 throughout September. Get your copy now!


 

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The Basics Of Building High-Trust Relationships: ‘…and Death Came Third!’ Anniversary Celebration

Ten years ago, in 2006, Peter Roper and Andy Lopata published the first edition of ‘…and Death Came Third! The Definitive Guide to Networking and Speaking in Public’ on Bookshaker. The book was a big success with over 2,000 copies sold in the first 48 hours alone.Panoma Press published the second edition in 2011 and negotiated a separate edition published in Malaysia and Singapore.

We have consistently been amazed by the affection held for ‘…and Death Came Third!’ by many readers, reflected by the emails and comments we have received from people from a range of backgrounds. The book focuses on the basics of networking and presentation skills, giving readers simple approaches to working the room at networking events or giving their first talk.

To celebrate this, we have got together with our network to provide a series of short ‘Basics’ blogs. Over the month of September Andy, Peter and Panoma Press owner Mindy Gibbins-Klein will share a guest blog every day exploring the basics of business, from the basics of confidence and attitude to negotiation and strategy. We have also made the Kindle edition of this excellent book just £1.99 or $2.99 throughout September, so if you haven’t read it yet, get your copy now!

Today’s blog comes from Sean Weafer and looks at The Basics of BuildingHigh-Trust Relationships

Trust is the key to successful business relationships. ‘High’ trust means that a person becomes absolutely open and willing to engage with you. It’s one of the ways in which an expert becomes an influencer.

There are things that people do unconsciously to build trust – but by understanding what we do and when to do them, we can choose to use them in situations where we have to think consciously about affecting a professional relationship.

Here I have included just three of the things that can help with building trust rapidly.

Eye Contact

We immediately start to judge a person by what we see and here is where we can score major bonus points immediately.

Firstly, our appearance is important. Suitable dress (appropriate to the circumstance), general hygiene, style of hair etc. will all help with the initial impact we make.

More subtly, eye contact (or the lack of it) plays a part in judgement.

Poor eye contact creates a negative feeling in the other person. It communicates a lack of) interest in the other person and nobody likes to be ‘overlooked’ and so they in turn will reflect that back to us and exhibit a similar low level of interest in us – hardly the best way to start an influential relationship.

We should always give good eye contact when we meet someone new. The eyes are the ‘windows of the soul’ and we can communicate very powerfully with just our eyes – when we flirt with someone for example or look skywards to portray exasperation.

For some of us however it is difficult to maintain eye contact without staring. This can be awkward as staring can often portray aggression or potential confrontation and most definitely will not assist us with developing good rapport!

In general, we create safe, neutral and yet effective eye-contact when we keep our gaze anywhere within an inverted triangle, with the apex ending at the point of the chin and the base of the triangle between the person’s eyes.

Keeping our gaze anywhere within this imaginary triangle will help us maintain good eye contact of a non-confrontational nature while keeping the person’s interest and attention on us.

The Handshake

A handshake is a powerful way to install feelings in someone as soon as ‘first contact’ is made. As most client decisions are emotionally based, we need to ensure that first feelings are good feelings.

For example, imagine how you feel when we get that loose, limp, “wet fish”, hand shake? Or what about the “earthquake” where the hand is seized and squeezed in a vice-like grip?

Sometimes clients may attempt to dominate the handshake (and hence the relationship) and their hand will be very prominently placed, palm downwards, on top of ours, deliberately (although probably unconsciously) placing us in a submissive position. They may even extend their hand with theirs pointing downwards, forcing us to place our hand underneath theirs.

To counteract this, all we have to do is cover the top of their hand by grasping it briefly with our other hand, so that we end up enclosing their original handshake in our two hands.

Now who’s in charge…and we have given a clear sign that we intend to conduct our business and relationship as equals.

However, we can also use this in our favour.

By being the first to engage someone by extending our hand palm upwards in the ‘submissive’ position – we immediately place our client in a ‘dominant’ (and therefore a safer) position.

Their immediate feelings are therefore of being in control, safe and as a result their initial anxiety is lessened – as is their potential resistance to us

Using Questions

To be a powerful influencer it’s important to remember that the person who controls the questions is the person who controls the conversation.

It’s also important to remember that, in general, people love to talk about themselves. They are their favourite subject – so let them.

It’s not often that we get an attentive audience and we tend to love the opportunity to talk about ourselves. We also tend to think very favourably about the people who listen attentively to our stories.

So, ask questions, be curious. It’s a powerful trust-building tool. It enhances the person’s feeling of safety with you, as the person they are hearing talking most is themselves – and who do they feel the safest and most comfortable with?

Sean Weafer is an executive coach and international keynote speaker who specialises ’in helping experts become influencers’ and invoking more Feminine energy into leadership in business and society. See more at http://www.SeanWeafer.com

 

Don’t forget: the Kindle edition of ‘…and Death Came Third!’ is available for just £1.99 or $2.99 throughout September. Get your copy now!

 

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The Basics of Cold Calling: ‘…and Death Came Third!’ Anniversary Celebration

Ten years ago, in 2006, Peter Roper and Andy Lopata published the first edition of ‘…and Death Came Third! The Definitive Guide to Networking and Speaking in Public’ on Bookshaker. The book was a big success with over 2,000 copies sold in the first 48 hours alone.Panoma Press published the second edition in 2011 and negotiated a separate edition published in Malaysia and Singapore.

We have consistently been amazed by the affection held for ‘…and Death Came Third!’ by many readers, reflected by the emails and comments we have received from people from a range of backgrounds. The book focuses on the basics of networking and presentation skills, giving readers simple approaches to working the room at networking events or giving their first talk.

To celebrate this, we have got together with our network to provide a series of short ‘Basics’ blogs. Over the month of September Andy, Peter and Panoma Press owner Mindy Gibbins-Klein will share a guest blog every day exploring the basics of business, from the basics of confidence and attitude to negotiation and strategy. We have also made the Kindle edition of this excellent book just £1.99 or $2.99 throughout September, so if you haven’t read it yet, get your copy now!

Today’s blog comes from Andy Preston and looks at The Basics of Cold Calling

It’s interesting, over the past couple of years, how fashionable it has been to ‘bash’ cold calling.  Some people have even gone so far as to label it as ‘dead’.

Actually, they couldn’t be more wrong.  Cold calling is still alive and well, and is still probably the fastest and best method of bringing in new business, quickly.

The problem is that it has evolved.  And therefore we need to evolve alongside it, otherwise we’ll get left behind.

So here are 3 tips that will help you get better results from your cold calls……

Cold Calling Tip No 1 – Get Everything Ready First

The first thing we need to ensure is that we have everything we need to hand BEFORE we start our calling session!

The minimum you should have is the details of the person you’re calling (including first name), you reason for the call, and any research you may have done to help introduce relevance onto the call.

If your call is to try and generate a meeting, you also want access to your own diary (or the diary of your colleague), so you can book the appointment in.

The above sounds so simple, yet I’m often amazed how many people don’t do this simple step before they start trying to make calls!

 

Cold Calling Tip No 2 – Don’t Try To Go From ‘Zero’ To ‘Hero’

A mistake a lot of people make is to try and achieve too much on their first calls!  It’s rare these days that a call will go from no contact prior to the call, to making a sale on the call itself.

Therefore the purpose of the call is to move the prospect to the next step in your sales process (if appropriate).  Whether that’s a meeting, a scheduled call back, a web demonstration, or a group conference call, that’s the focus of where you call should be.

Remember, we’re looking to get buy-in from the decision maker, and get their agreement to move to the next step.  That’s tough enough, without trying to achieve a sale here too!

 

Cold Calling Tip No 3 – Get Into A Conversation!

One of the most important things to remember, is that this is meant to be a conversation!  Most cold calls unfortunately sound more like a ‘monologue’ – where the salesperson is desperately trying to get all the benefits of their product across to the prospect as quickly as possible!

A good call is where more of a conversation takes place, and the salesperson is able to get the prospect talking as much as possible.  The more of a ‘conversation’ the call is, there more interest and value there is for the prospect, and they are far more likely to agree to your next step!

Good luck with your sales calls, and I hope to hear about your sales success going forwards!

Andy Preston is a Global Sales Speaker and Sales Trainer, specialising in cold calling and new business.  Andy has trained more than 100,000 people, in 27 countries since 2004.  Connect with Andy (and get his sales advice) on Linkedin – www.linkedin.com/in/andypreston

 

 

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The Basics of Intrapreneurship: ‘…and Death Came Third!’ 10th Anniversary

Ten years ago, in 2006, Peter Roper and Andy Lopata published the first edition of ‘…and Death Came Third! The Definitive Guide to Networking and Speaking in Public’ on Bookshaker. The book was a big success with over 2,000 copies sold in the first 48 hours alone.Panoma Press published the second edition in 2011 and negotiated a separate edition published in Malaysia and Singapore.

We have consistently been amazed by the affection held for ‘…and Death Came Third!’ by many readers, reflected by the emails and comments we have received from people from a range of backgrounds. The book focuses on the basics of networking and presentation skills, giving readers simple approaches to working the room at networking events or giving their first talk.

To celebrate this, we have got together with our network to provide a series of short ‘Basics’ blogs. Over the month of September Andy, Peter and Panoma Press owner Mindy Gibbins-Klein will share a guest blog every day exploring the basics of business, from the basics of confidence and attitude to negotiation and strategy. We have also made the Kindle edition of this excellent book just £1.99 or $2.99 throughout September, so if you haven’t read it yet, get your copy now!

Today’s post comes to us courtesy of Rebecca Jones, who is a speaker, mentor and consultant focused on business growth and entrepreneurship. A member of the Professional Speaking Association of the UK and Ireland, along with Peter, Andy and Mindy. Rebecca is also known as The Red Shoe Biz Woman.

Intrapreneurship – is it the answer to business sustainability?

As with anything in business leadership and management, intrapreneurship isn’t going to be a quick fix. However, I believe that it really could be the answer to developing a more sustainable business model with staff involved in the development and profitability of your company.

What is intrapreneurship?

Intrapreneurship is the basic concept of taking enterprise and enterprising ways of working and placing it inside an organisation. It can be about individuals, teams or the whole company taking on board a more enterprising approach. This is not about staff taking a risk but rather staff being responsive to the needs of the customer.

The way in which the business environment is constantly changing means we need to keep changing and adapting the way we deliver to our customers. This can be exhausting for the leaders of the company who continually have to come up with ideas to move the business forward. By implementing intrapreneurship and encouraging staff at all levels to become involved you now have a larger range of people on the look out for ideas to help the business grow.

Intrapreneurship, when done well, is a more strategically responsive option. It is more likely to produce longer term profitable working solutions. This is not about knee-jerk reactions often encountered when we ask staff to be responsive to customer need. This is about being aware of the bigger picture, how your company fits into it and being aware of the needs of customers.

Why encourage intrapreneurship?

We all know that we are living and working in a time of change, where personalised options are becoming more normal. Clients have higher expectations than ever before and are looking for a business that understands their needs and provides for them as efficiently as possible. In order to do this staff need to know what they can do to respond to need. How far are they able to go and do they see a possible opportunity to move the idea forward?

Staff engagement

If you have tried staff engagement but not really found a way to really connect with your staff members, intrapreneurship can be not only a solution but one which also produces great results. This is because in order for staff to be intrapreneurial they need to understand the business at a deeper level. They need to know what its aims are and how it plans on getting there. The staff then need to develop ideas which are aligned to the business plans and assist the business in getting there. They then work on the ideas and feel a greater part of the development of the business as well as being given an opportunity to utilise and build additional skills.

What do you need to consider?

First of all, you need to be aware of the three key elements of intrapreneurial ideas that staff can develop:

-        money saving solutions

-        additional ways of selling your current services or products (eg amending them for a new market etc)

-       completely new ideas or additional offerings for the business

In order to assist staff in coming up with the ideas and developing them further, they will require:

-        a good foundation of knowledge about the business and its plans

-        trust in their employer and others around them that they will be supported, encouraged and not punished if an idea doesn’t work

-        a sense of pride in their work (although this can also grow as they become more involved in intrapreneurial projects)

-        an understanding of customer need and a willingness to put the customers at the heart of all ideas and decision-making

-        support from others

-        confidence to give things a try

-        resilience to try again when things fail.

Whilst enterprise within a company is not new, for many smaller companies, it is not an idea they have considered. Not only can it benefit the business in increasing its income and profitability but it can also develop more committed staff members who are less likely to leave and have great pride in their work.

For more information about Rebecca’s work on intrapreneurship visit www.rebeccajones.biz and keep an eye out for her forthcoming book on enterprise within companies.

 

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The Basics Of The Buying Mentality: ‘…and Death Came Third!’ 10th Anniversary Celebration

Ten years ago, in 2006, Andy Lopata and Peter Roper published the first edition of ‘… and Death Came Third! The Definitive Guide to Networking and Speaking in Public’ on Bookshaker. The book was a big success with over 2,000 copies sold in the first 48 hours alone, a second edition published by Panoma (formerly Ecademy) Press in 2011 and a separate edition published in Malaysia and Singapore.

We have consistently been amazed by the affection held for ‘…and Death Came Third!’ by many readers, reflected by the emails and comments we have received from people from a range of backgrounds. The book really focuses on the basics of networking and presentation skills, giving readers simple approaches to working the room at networking events or giving their first talk.

To celebrate this, each day over the month of September will see a new guest blog exploring the basics of business, from the basics of confidence and attitude to negotiation and strategy.

Today’s blog is written by Simon Hazeldine, where he outlines the Basics of The Buying Mentality

A very common reason for sales failure is orientating your sales approach to meet your own objectives.  If you are viewing the sales process mainly from your perspective, then customers will often resist (because no-one likes a pushy salesperson) and a failed sale is the result.

This is a flawed approach because it is the customer who will make the final decision to buy from you or not, and they will only do so if they believe that the purchase will benefit them.  It would therefore make sense to consider things more fully from their perspective.

If you want to sell more successfully, and with greater ease, you need to understand the basics of the buying mentality. Here are three ideas to take action on:

1)      Shift your perspective

Stop thinking about the sale from your perspective. Don’t think about it as a sale at all. Think about it from the perspective of the customer’s buying process.  Your aim is to help, support and appropriately challenge the customer to make a good buying decision.  The more you focus on helping the customer get what they want, the easier it is for you to get what you want.

2)      Elicit the customer’s buying process

Ask your customer to outline the process they will be going through when making their buying decision. In some cases, this will be an informal process but usually the more expensive or important the decision, the more formal the buying process will be.

An example of a buying process would be that firstly the customer realises that they have a problem and they will then identify a possible solution to that problem.  They will conduct research and then using the information they have gained they will identify their preferred solution and potential suppliers. They will request pricing quotations and compare these before negotiating to get the best possible deal and placing their order with the chosen supplier.

3)      Align your selling process to match the customer’s buying process

When you do this you will be providing the customer with whatever it is they need at the time they need it, so that they can move through their buying process to a successful conclusion.  When you do this well, the successful conclusion will usually involve making the decision to purchase from you.  An awareness of their buying process allows you to get ahead of the game and be well prepared as each stage presents itself. The earlier you are involved the greater the degree of influence you will have.

Good luck and good selling!

Simon Hazeldine MSc FinstSMM is an international speaker and consultant in the areas of sales, negotiation, performance leadership and applied neuroscience.
Simon helps forward thinking sales leaders create high performance sales organisations that people want to belong to, and is the originator of the unique neuroscience based “Brain Friendly Selling” system.

He is the bestselling author of five business books:

  • Neuro-Sell: How Neuroscience Can Power Your Sales Success
  • Bare Knuckle Selling
  • Bare Knuckle Negotiating
  • Bare Knuckle Customer Service
  • The Inner Winner

To learn more about Simon’s keynote speeches and other services please visit:
http://www.simonhazeldine.com

To subscribe to Simon’s hard hitting “Selling and Negotiating Power Tips newsletter please visit: http://www.sellingandnegotiatingpowertips.com

 

Don’t forget: the Kindle edition of ‘…and Death Came Third!’ is available for just £1.99 or $2.99 throughout September. Get your copy now!

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The Basics of Achievement Thinking: ‘…and Death Came Third!’ 10th Anniversary Celebration

Ten years ago, in 2006, Andy Lopata and Peter Roper published the first edition of ‘… and Death Came Third! The Definitive Guide to Networking and Speaking in Public’ on Bookshaker. The book was a big success with over 2,000 copies sold in the first 48 hours alone, a second edition published by Panoma (formerly Ecademy) Press in 2011 and a separate edition published in Malaysia and Singapore.

We have consistently been amazed by the affection held for ‘…and Death Came Third!’ by many readers, reflected by the emails and comments we have received from people from a range of backgrounds. The book really focuses on the basics of networking and presentation skills, giving readers simple approaches to working the room at networking events or giving their first talk.

To celebrate this, each day over the month of September will see a new guest blog exploring the basics of business, from the basics of confidence and attitude to negotiation and strategy.

Today’s blog is written by John Hotowka, where he outlines the Basics of Achievement Thinking

Have you noticed how, even when times are tough, there are always people and organisations who are successful and resilient.  What’s more they flourish irrespective of the state of the economy and the challenges thrown at them.  The key lies in their mind-set.

No matter how much knowledge and training you have you can’t achieve anything unless you can think in the right way.

‘Achievement Thinking’ is a collection of simple tools to empower you to manage change and build resilience.  I’ve even personally used the same business tools to safely lose 100 lbs (45 Kg) of excess weight.

Once your mind-set is right you can achieve almost anything.

The basic premise of ‘Achievement’ Thinking is being mindful and the first thing we need to be mindful of is our thoughts and behaviours.

If there’s an action we need to carry out and it’s of benefit to us sometimes we hesitate or talk ourselves out of doing that action.  An example might be making a follow up call after meeting someone at a networking event.  Many people talk themselves out of making the call, for whatever reason.

Here’s a guide how to overcome that unhelpful self-talk or hesitancy.  Ask yourself, ‘Is this action of benefit to me?  Is it illegal or life threatening?’  If the answer to the first question is ‘yes’ and the second one ‘no’ then, I suggest, we be brave and just do it.

Another element of ‘Achievement Thinking’ is asking for the help we need when we need it.  Often we let our pride (read ego) get in our way by thinking that asking for help is a weakness when in fact it’s a strength.  Successful people know they can’t achieve their goals on their own and ask for help when necessary.  Many even go as far as to surround themselves with a support group of several confidants and meet on a regular basis for mutual support and to share insights and knowledge… now there’s an idea.

Finally I’d like to touch on focus.  Unless we train ourselves for many of us our default thinking is to be problem focused when we’re faced with a challenge.  For example if we’re going to a destination by bus and we miss the bus we can waste time focusing on the problem, i.e. thinking, ‘I’ve missed the bus, I’m now going to be late’.  Once we’re mindful of our thoughts being problem focused it’s easy to switch to being solution focused.  Once we’re clear what we want our outcome to be we ask questions such as, ‘What are my options now?  Who can I turn to?  What time’s the next bus?’  By asking questions our wonderful subconscious mind is more likely to find solutions.

John Hotowka – The Achievement Thinking speaker gives insights and tools to individuals and teams to help them build resilience and manage change

http://www.hotowka.co.uk/

Don’t forget: the Kindle edition of ‘…and Death Came Third!’ is available for just £1.99 or $2.99 throughout September. Get your copy now!



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The Basics of Social Media: ‘…and Death Came Third!’ 10th Anniversary Celebration

Ten years ago, in 2006, Andy Lopata and Peter Roper published the first edition of ‘… and Death Came Third! The Definitive Guide to Networking and Speaking in Public’ on Bookshaker. The book was a big success with over 2,000 copies sold in the first 48 hours alone, a second edition published by Panoma (formerly Ecademy) Press in 2011 and a separate edition published in Malaysia and Singapore.

We have consistently been amazed by the affection held for ‘…and Death Came Third!’ by many readers, reflected by the emails and comments we have received from people from a range of backgrounds. The book really focuses on the basics of networking and presentation skills, giving readers simple approaches to working the room at networking events or giving their first talk.

To celebrate this, each day over the month of September will see a new guest blog exploring the basics of business, from the basics of confidence and attitude to negotiation and strategy.

Today’s blog is written by Steve Bustin and is about the Basics of Social Media

Social media is not only ubiquitous in business these days – it’s essential. Your customers expect to be able to find and interact with you on social media so if you’re not there, you might as well have shut up shop, as your competitors will be all too happy to pick up the conversation with those customers.

There are still a lot of businesses that struggle to see value in social media so either don’t bother or expend serious amounts of time and money without being sure whether they’re getting any return on their investment. Here are three things you should be doing to maximise that return:

1. Set some social media goals. Why are you on social media? Who are you trying to reach and what do you want them to do once you’ve reached them? Do you want them to click through to your website? Share your content? Reply to your posts? You need to understand what you’re trying to do.

The key one is to know who you’re trying to reach – and go and hang out where they hang out. If you’re after young customers, you need to be on Instagram and Snapchat. If you’re after B2B customers, LinkedIn is where you need to concentrate your efforts. Better to be on one platform and do it well than spread yourself across a number of platforms and use them all poorly.

2. Measure your social media activity. A lot of businesses get obsessed with the wrong numbers – how many followers/likes/connections they’ve got. This is a really blunt measure because you can have tens of thousands of followers but if they’re not engaging with you, they’re worthless. Better to have a couple of hundred really engaged followers than thousands who think you’re spam.

Measure engagement instead: Replies, responses, shares, comments, messages, click-throughs etc. If you’re not getting enough engagement, change what you’re doing. If nothing else, ask a question when you post on social media as it’s an invitation to reply – to engage.

3. Mix it up. Keep it varied. No two consecutive posts should look the same. Add images, video, infographics, blog links, shares of other people’s content, competitions, advice, humour, questions and even  (occasionally) sales messages to the mix on your social media feed. Make it useful, fun, engaging and shareable and people will come back for more and share your content – and your brand – for you.

Steve Bustin is a Business Communications Expert, coaching, training and speaking to businesses on a range of communication channels including social media, public relations and presentation skills. See www.stevebustin.com for more details.

Don’t forget: the Kindle edition of ‘…and Death Came Third!’ is available for just £1.99 or $2.99 throughout September. Get your copy now!

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